Tag Archives: party

The Bad News



by Gerald Celente

Previously
by Gerald Celente:
Where
Is My Money?



“Wake-Up
Call” Trend:

The Decline of America trend is nowhere near bottom, and the worse
is yet to come.

One
year later:
“Worse” has happened, as the country
piles up more and more debt, politicians are gridlocked, paralyzed
in some perpetual political traffic jam of inaction.

“Crack-Up
2011” Trend:
Teetering economies will collapse, currency
wars will ensue, trade barriers will be erected, economic unions
will splinter…

One
year later:
The Sovereign debt crisis threatens both the
European Union and Euro, currency wars are underway and the US and
China are trading trade barbs.

“Crime
Time” Trend:
No job + no money + compounding debt
= high stress, strained relations, short fuses. Hardship-driven
crimes will be committed across the socioeconomic spectrum by legions
of the on-the-edge desperate who will do whatever they must to keep
a roof over their heads and put food on the table.

One
year later:
Thieves are stealing copper piping and cables,
cooking oil and temple donation boxes; “Criminal recycling”
is flourishing; in 2011 a record number of cyber crimes is reported
to the FBI: more than 23,000 per month.

“Screw
the People” Trend:
As times get even tougher and people
get even poorer, the “authorities” will intensify their
efforts to extract the funds needed to meet fiscal obligations.

One
year later:
In the two-tier American justice
system, the long arm of the law only reaches down to the low hanging
fruit. Banks are slapped with slap on the wrist fines for billion
dollar crimes, and like Jon Corzine, no crime time. But swift justice
is readily dealt out for small time crimes. From closing down lemonade
stands operating without a license to swat teams busting raw foods
cooperatives, in America, Justice means “just us!”

“Students
of the World Unite” Trend:
“University degrees
in hand yet out of work, in debt and with no prospects on the horizon,
young adults and 20-somethings are mad as hell, and they’re not
going to take it anymore.”

One
year later:
Occupy Wall Street is just one of the scores
of worldwide student protest movements, some of which have proven
powerful enough to bring down governments.

“Crackdown
on Liberty” Trend:
A national crusade to “Get
Tough on Crime” will be waged against the citizenry. And just
as in the “War on Terror,” where “suspected terrorists”
are killed before proven guilty or jailed without trial, in the
“War on Crime” everyone is a suspect until proven innocent.

One
year later:
TSA strip searches of little
old ladies; Obama backs bill “authorizing indefinite military detention
of U.S. citizens.”

“Journalism
2.0” Trend:
With its unparalleled reach across borders
and language barriers, “Journalism 2.0” has the potential
to influence and educate citizens in a way that governments and
corporate media moguls would never permit.

One
year later:
Aleksai Navalny, an imprisoned
young Russian blogger/Twitterer with some 200,000 followers, is
“credited with mobilizing a generation of young Russians through
social media, a leap much like the one that spawned Occupy Wall
Street and youth uprisings across Europe this year.”

“Cyberwars”
Trend:
The demonstrable effects of Cyberwar and its companion,
Cybercrime, are already significant – and will come of age in 2011.
Equally disruptive will be the harsh measures taken by global governments
to control free access to the web, identify its users, and literally
shut down computers that it considers a threat to national security.

One
year later:
Iran proudly displayed a sleek,
white U.S. drone that was used for spying on Iranians; Iranians
were able to capture what US military officials privately told Bloomberg
was a Lockheed Martin RQ-170 by hacking into its security code;
PayPal shuts off service to WikiLeaks.

December
17, 2011

Gerald Celente
is founder and director of The Trends Research Institute, author
of
Trends
2000
and Trend
Tracking
(Warner Books), and publisher of The Trends
Journal. He has been forecasting trends since 1980, and recently
called “The Collapse of ’09.”

Copyright ©
2011 Gerald Celente

The
Best of Gerald Celente

Democratic Fairfax Embraces Its Inner Tea Party

You can’t get a whole lot more Democratic than Fairfax County,
just outside of D.C.  Barack Obama carried Fairfax 60-38
against John McCain in 2008. That’s six percentage points higher
than Obama’s statewide margin, which Fairfax helped inflate because
it is the commonwealth’s largest locality: 13.5 percent of
Virginians live there. Four years before, George W. Bush carried
Virginia with 54 percent of the vote – but not Fairfax, where John
Kerry got 53 percent.

The county board of supervisors reflects the split as well.
Seven of the 10 members are Democrats. That makes its recent stance
on state government rather amusing.

Each year localities around Virginia draw up their wish lists
for the General Assembly session that convenes in January. Virginia
is a Dillon Rule state, which means that localities are under the
thumb of state government and must go hat in hand to the
legislature to get permission to do many things. Fairfax recently
completed its wish list for the 2012 session.

And what do the supervisors want from Richmond? “I think the
simple message is, ‘Please try to leave us alone,’ ” says
Supervisor Jeff McKay.

How very Tea Party of them. Perhaps Fairfax should replace its
county seal with the Gadsden Flag – that yellow banner, popular at
Tea Party rallies, with coiled snake and the legend, “Don’t Tread
on Me.”

That’s not the only way in which heavily Democratic Fairfax
sounds sympathetic to the Tea Party rabble. Like those grassroots
conservatives in tricorner hats, the county also thinks
it is Taxed Enough Already.

Fairfax is one of the richest counties in America. With a
median household income in six figures, it comes in second only to
the nation’s richest county, next-door Loudoun. And yet, as
reported recently in The Washington Post, the
county’s wish list “includes other perennial desires: that Northern
Virginia taxpayers see more of the money they send to Richmond, for
example.”

“Overall, the county would be pleased if the Virginia General
Assembly would stop using Northern Virginia as its piggybank,”
continues The Post. Translation: Fairfax does
not want to “spread the wealth around,” as Barack Obama put it to
Joe the Plumber. But wait – Obama says spreading the wealth around
is “good for everybody.” Does the county disagree?

When asked why he robbed banks, Willie Sutton famously replied
that that’s where the money is. Same goes for Northern Virginia:
The heavily populated, high-income region generates a big chunk of
the state’s wealth. Where else should legislators look for revenue
– Pearisburg (population 2,700, median household income
$40,000)? 

 What happened to making the rich pay their fair share?
 

Dig deeper into the county’s wish list and you find other gems.
It wants more state aid to localities, and opposes any funding cuts
(“erosions of the social safety net”) that might leave localities
on the hook for Medicaid costs. Translation: Let’s have lots of
health care, paid for by someone else. There’s limousine liberalism
in a nutshell. As George Mason University’s
Bryan Caplan once explained, “The wealthy but
uncharitable socialist ceases to be a mystery once you understand
relative prices. Voluntary charity is costly to the giver, but
voting for charity … is virtually free.”

The supervisors also want to prohibit protests at funerals. They
support efforts to fight global warming by mandating cuts in
greenhouse gas emissions. They want the power to prohibit
discrimination based on sexual orientation. They also oppose the
push to protect property owners from eminent-domain abuse.

In brief, then, Fairfax officials are eager to order other
people about. They just don’t want to take any orders from
Richmond. Unfortunately, the Dillon Rule says they have to.

Funny thing about that rule. It was named after John Forest
Dillon, an Iowa Supreme Court justice back in the Tammany Hall era
who thought little of local government. He believed that “those
best fitted by their intelligence, business experience, capacity
and moral character” did not generally enter local government. So
local governments needed close  watching.

That’s not wildly different from how much of contemporary
liberalism looks at ordinary citizens. In the eyes of contemporary
liberalism everyday Americans need the firm guidance of their
liberal betters lest they make poor choices or, through their
choices, produce results liberals dislike, such as
unbridled commerce or economic disparity.

A. Barton Hinkle on the Tea Party Impulses of Northern Virginia Democrats

You can’t get a whole lot more Democratic than
Fairfax County, just outside of D.C.  Barack Obama carried
Fairfax 60-38 against John McCain in 2008. That’s six percentage
points higher than Obama’s statewide margin, which Fairfax helped
inflate because it is the commonwealth’s largest locality: 13.5
percent of Virginians live there. Four years before, George W. Bush
carried Virginia with 54 percent of the vote—but not Fairfax, where
John Kerry got 53 percent. The county board of supervisors
reflects the split as well, writes A. Barton Hinkle. Seven of the
10 members are Democrats. That makes its recent stance on state
government—”Please try to leave us alone”—rather amusing.