Why did no one help her? Distraught teenager sent 144 tweets expressing her …

By
Daily Mail Reporter

Last updated at 5:32 AM on 11th November 2011

An 18-year-old high school student sent 144 tweets expressing her pain and grief before killing herself.

Ashley Billasano did not go to her school in Rosenberg, a suburb of Houston, Texas, as usual on Tuesday morning.

Instead, the senior at BF Terry High School took to her Twitter page, posting more than 100 tweets over the course of six hours.

Tragic: 18-year-old high school student Ashley Billasano sent 144 tweets expressing her pain and grief before killing herself

Tragic: 18-year-old high school student Ashley Billasano sent 144 tweets expressing her pain and grief before killing herself

In the messages, the pretty 18-year-old said she has been molested and forced into prostitution, My Fox Houston reported.

More than 500 people were following
her Twitter account when she tweeted, ‘I’d love to hear what you have to
say but I wont be around.’

And finally her last tweet,
‘Take two. I hope I get this right.’

The troubled teen used the social networking website to describe how she  felt the first time she was abused. She wrote: [afterwards] ‘I went to the bathroom and locked the door’

SOME OF ASHLEY’S FINAL TWEETS

9:45AM Nov 7th: There is somebody in my dreams
9:46AM Nov 7th: I want them gone
9:47AM Nov 7th: Kinda lonely right now
9:47AM Nov 7th: There was so much more I wanted to do
9:48AM Nov 7th: Ahhh well time to move on
9:48AM Nov 7th:  My thought process is too crazy
9:48AM Nov 7th: I totally think I’m bipolar
9:49AM Nov 7th: Or just crazy
10:21AM Nov 7th: My legs hurt. And my heart was filled with despair
10:21AM Nov 7th: I went to the bathroom and locked the door
10:22AM Nov 7th: I took apart a razor I had just gotten from the store
10:22AM Nov 7th: I did what I had to do to forget.
1:47PM Nov 7th: Well that’s. The story of how I came to be who I am. Well the condensed version. I’d love to hear what you have to say. But I won’t be around
2:08PM Nov 7th: Take two. Hope I get this right

‘I took apart a razor. I did what I had to do to forget. I swear after that night I was never the same’

She explained that she had confided in adults about the horrific secret, but nothing happened.

‘I remember telling my closest teacher and CPS and the police detectives’ she said.

‘I remember having to tell them everything.’

Chief Craig Brady of the Fort Bend
County Sheriff’s Department told My Fox Houston: ‘It’s obvious she needed somebody to talk to
and that’s what I believe those tweets were.

‘She was trying to
communicate and trying to get people to talk to her.’

Brady said Ashley had made allegations of abuse a year ago in Williamson County, near Austin.

According to friends the suffering Ashley wanted her death to make a difference even though her life had become insufferable.

Her 144 tweets, which took place over six hours on 7th November and finished a short time before she killed herself through suffocation, seemed to recount sexual abuse at the hands of a family member and other adults.

Ashly Escamilla, her classmate and best friend told the Houston Chronicle: ‘This wasn’t random. She planned this for a reason.

‘She made a decision that this was what she was going to do to get attention if she was not going to get justice.’

Loss: More than 500 people were following Ashley's account when she wrote her last tweets

Loss: More than 500 people were following Ashley's account when she wrote her last tweets

Loss: More than 500 people were following Ashley’s account when she wrote her last tweets

Ashly Escamilla said that her friend had craved justice from ‘the beginning’ of the alleged abuse, when she was aged 14.

She told the Chronicle: ‘She said police and CPS acted like it was
nothing. She said it was like they did not want to believe her.

‘So, to
go on living when someone hurt her, and no one ever did anything about
it – wouldn’t that drive you insane? To feel ignored by people who were
supposed to help you. That was crazy.

The grieving friend added: ‘She had support from me and my
boyfriend and her mom, but she did not have justice.

‘She needed to get
her point across and to make it known that she was wronged.’

Ashly Escamilla remembers her friend
as a fun, but caring person, closer than any sister.

Ashley Billasano,
known as Billy to her friends, had moved to Rosenberg only last year, but the two
girls were very quickly, in their own words, like ‘peas and carrots.’

The two school girls would sometimes dress up as Batman and Robin to go and get tacos at night.

Soon before her death Billy gave the
‘other’ Ashly a poignant reminder of their friendship- two
glow-in-the-dark stars to attach to the ceiling of her room to see
before she went to sleep each night.

Ashley Billasano’s mother, Tiffany Ruiz
Leskinen, told the Chronicle her daughter told a teacher about the
sexual abuse. The school told police but the investigation did not go
anywhere, she said.

Leskinen said that the detective told
her that she had trouble believing Ashley. She said: ‘Here is someone who has been
abused and is forced to be silent for so long.

‘Then the one person you
go to looking for help says they might not believe you.’

Young: Ashley Billasano, known as Billy to her friends, had moved to Rosenberg only last year

Young: Ashley Billasano, known as Billy to her friends, had moved to Rosenberg only last year

Investigation: Police looking into the abuse told Ashley's mom that they had trouble believing her daughter's story

Investigation: Police looking into the abuse told Ashley’s mom that they had trouble believing her daughter’s story. Ashley is pictured left

Chief Brady said: ‘My understanding, that was looked into the sheriff’s office there, the D.A’S office and a grand jury. There was no indictment issued.’

On her last day Ashley tweeted ‘Weeks passed, then I got the call. They said sorry but there isn’t enough evidence I hung up.’

‘That’s when I changed. I didn’t care anymore and the people I was meeting gave me no reason to.’

Police said they didn’t want a lot of detail about her death to be published  to avoid encouraging copy cats, but said it might not be the first time the teen had tried to take her own life.

Brady said: ‘Authorities believe this was not the first time she had attempted suicide.  She had learned the method of the internet.’

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Here’s what readers have had to say so far. Why not add your thoughts below,
or debate this issue live on our message boards.

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

Heart rending. I hope this will give some pause for thought.

Poor child.

the highest form of self criticism

I don’t know. Why didn’t you or someone else in the media help her? Why don’t you set up a fund in her name now? Why don’t you send money to her family to pay for her funeral? I mean, if you’re going to ask questions to blame the world for not responding to this girl’s cry for help……what did YOU do to help her?

It’s hard to understand how that many “followers” did not respond appropriately to her tweets…The pain she must have felt in her heart to go to such drastic measures…It was clear by the many tweets that she was reaching out for comfort…Rest In Peace Blessed Child…

This is so sad, rest in peace Ashley. She had a lovely smile and was such a pretty girl. As to the DM’s question about why no body helped despite all the tweets, I think that people really don’t pay attention to tweets even if they appear to be “following” the person on twitter. It is just so much data that goes around everyday.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Husband, wife plead guilty in 2009 murder

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Husband, wife plead guilty in 2009 murder

Credit: Williamson Co. Sheriff’s Office

Husband, wife plead guilty in 2009 murder

by JORDAN ARMSTRONG / KVUE.com

kvue.com

Posted on November 10, 2011 at 2:23 PM

Updated
today at 3:12 PM

WILLIAMSON COUNTY, Texas — A Central Texas couple has pleaded guilty in the 2009 death of the wife’s ex-husband.

Charles Kevin Bowen, 44, and Jennifer Bowen, 31, were scheduled to go to trial on Nov. 14 but changed their minds and pleaded guilty to murder on Thursday.

Williamson County officials say in March 2009, 41-year-old John David Blattner went missing. His body was found April 11, 2009 near an abandoned property outside of Taylor. He had been shot in the head and hip.

The Texas Rangers, Taylor Police Department, Round Rock Police Department and the Williamson County Sheriff’s Office investigated. They found out that Blattner was last seen with his ex-wife, Jennifer Bowen, and he was supposed to appear in court for a child custody case near the time he went missing. He and Bowen had an eight-year-old daughter and authorities learned that Blattner planned to change their child custody agreement.

Kevin and Jennifer Bowen were soon arrested after the investigation revealed that they lured Blattner to the Taylor location and killed him to avoid the custody changes. It was revealed that Kevin Bowen threw the murder weapon, a pistol into a nearby river. DNA evidence found on a cigarette at the scene also linked Kevin Bowen to the crime.

He and Jennifer have now confessed to killing Blattner.

Kevin Bowen was sentenced to 50 years in prison. Jennifer Bowen was sentenced to 40 years. They each must serve half of their sentence before being eligible for parole.


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New arrest in Texas wrongful conviction case

In this booking Nov. 9, 2011, booking mugshot provided by the
Williamson County Sheriff’s Office, Mark Alan Norwood, 57, is
shown. Authorities have identified Norwood as a new suspect who has
been arrested in the murder of a Texas woman whose husband was
wrongfully convicted of the slaying and spent nearly 25 years in
prison before DNA evidence led to his release. (AP Photo/Williamson
County Sheriff’s Office)

Welcome to the discussion.

Husband, wife plead guilty for 2009 murder

WILLIAMSON COUNTY, Texas — A Central Texas couple has pleaded guilty in the 2009 death of the wife’s ex-husband.

Charles Kevin Bowen, 44, and Jennifer Bowen, 31, were scheduled to go to trial on Nov. 14 but changed their minds and pleaded guilty to murder on Thursday.

Williamson County officials say in March 2009, 41-year-old John David Blattner went missing. His body was found April 11, 2009 near an abandoned property outside of Taylor. He had been shot in the head and hip.

The Texas Rangers, Taylor Police Department, Round Rock Police Department and the Williamson County Sheriff’s Office investigated. They found out that Blattner was last seen with his ex-wife, Jennifer Bowen, and he was supposed to appear in court for a child custody case near the time he went missing. He and Bowen had an eight-year-old daughter and authorities learned that Blattner planned to change their child custody agreement.

Kevin and Jennifer Bowen were soon arrested after the investigation revealed that they lured Blattner to the Taylor location and killed him to avoid the custody changes. It was revealed that Kevin Bowen threw the murder weapon, a pistol into a nearby river. DNA evidence found on a cigarette at the scene also linked Kevin Bowen to the crime.

He and Jennifer have now confessed to killing Blattner.

Kevin Bowen was sentenced to 50 years in prison. Jennifer Bowen was sentenced to 40 years. They each must serve half of their sentence before being eligible for parole.

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