Chicago Alderman Who Told Businessman to ‘Come Back To Me On Your Knees’ Sued for Abuse of Power

Chicago Alderman Proco Joe Moreno wanted to help a business that had contributed to his campaign coffers. So he told Brian Strauss, a firefighter and property owner, to rent his building to the business or suffer the consequences. When Strauss refused to comply, Moreno made good on his threats, downzoning Strauss’s building and scuttling multiple attempts to sell the property.

Strauss is now suing, arguing that Moreno’s abuses of his aldermanic powers violate Strauss’ rights under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

According to Strauss’s suit, Moreno’s threats and eventual downzoning “were completely out of character with both the zoning and actual uses of the neighborhood,” “were proposed in bad faith,” and “were done for personal rather than a public interest”.

Strauss’s trouble began in late 2015, when he tried to evict the Double Door Music Hall from a Wicker Park property his family had owned since the ’60s. (The eviction was prompted by several lease violations.) Moreno, who had received more than $7,500 in campaign donations from Double Door’s management, requested that Strauss let the business stay on.

Strauss declined and began looking for another tenant. Then Moreno’s gloves came off.

“I’m tired of hearing about the sympathy of you and your family,” the alderman reportedly told Strauss and his attorney at one meeting. “Double Door is going to be in that building, there will never be another tenant in there, there will never be another sign on that building.”

Over the coming months, Moreno—in meetings brokered and attended by staffers for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel—tried to get Strauss to sell his building to Double Door for $7 million, despite its market value of nearly $10 million.

When that failed, the alderman started introducing downzoning proposals for Strauss’s property that would have made it off limits for most business uses. In June 2017, Moreno even tried to reclassify the building as a residential unit, which would prohibit practically all commercial uses.

That failed, but in September the city council did pass a downzoning ordinance, which prevents Strauss from converting his property to a general

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